2003 Issues of TechLine News

Winter 2003-2004 
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  • Integration, perseverance key successful vegetation management programs
  • Wildlife habitat improves with herbicide treatment vs. fire: Native species respond when sagebrush is thinned or controlled
  • Public involved in integrated weed control efforts: Cooperative weed management area for 2.3 million acres
  • Hand pulling works best in conjunction with other methods: Hand pulling project gains public involvement in weed control
  • A critical resource preserved: Invasives threaten watershed and wildlife habitat

Winter 2002-2003 (East)
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  • Sounds research, integrated methods, and persistence key these successful programs
  • Park's protocols lead others toward successful management: Shenandoah National Park managers develop effective vegetation control program
  • Sound research aids preservation effort: Managing invasives preserves old growth forest for study and public enjoyment
  • Managing Akebia quinata at the James Madison Landmark Forest: An evaluation of herbicides and the timing of application
  • Cherokee National Forest managers convert fescue grasslands to native grasses

Winter 2003
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  • Weed management progress results when cooperation and creativity are matched with right techniques
  • Private-public partnership yields success: Cooperative effort preserves waterfowl and big game habitats
  • Enterprise fund and integrated methods solve economic and weed control challenge
  • Success possible even on toughest invasives: Management tools must be practical and matched to right environment
  • Wildlife habitat, other lands benefit in coordinated project: "It hasn't been easy, but it's been worth it."
  • Agro 8x8 floats over deadfall, steep terrain, and water: Low ground pressure vehicle fits forest applications
  • Utility vehicle extends range: Kawasaki mules fit where other ATVs don't

Summer 2003
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  • Successful tamarisk and purple loosestrife programs: Persistence and right management tools restore riparian areas
  •  Integrated, persistent, planned management keys success: Tamarisk impacts riparian environments in multiple negative ways
  • Innovative techniques stop purple loosestrife threat: Invasive threatens entire Colorado River basin.
  • Experience generates successful methods: Exotic plant management teams lead control efforts on tamarisk
  • Tamarisk management restores native species to arches National Park: Right techniques help reclaim habitat
  • Saving the last unchanged miles of the Missouri River from invasives: Integrated program restores river riparian areas
  • Biocontrol and unique plant exchange program stop loosestrife: Renowned boys and girls town help manage invasives

Fall (Eastern) 2003
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  • A tradition of invasives management maintains momentum: Exotic vegetation challenges Great Smokey Mountains NP managers
  • Cooperative effort restores turkey habitat: Vegetation management on power line ROW enhances wildlife habitat
  • Project demonstrates what a few people can accomplish: Local citizens make "bittersweet sweep" on Blue Ridge parkway
  • Saving the last unchanged miles of the Missouri River from invasives: Integrated program restores river riparian areas
  • Biocontrol and unique plant exchange program stop loosestrife: Renowned girls and boys town help manage invasives