Effect of Milestone® on Canada Thistle and the Native Plant Community in a Restored Tallgrass Prairie

Effect of Milestone® on Canada Thistle and the Native Plant Community in a Restored Tallgrass Prairie

Native tallgrass prairies are diverse ecosystems that evolved with periodic disturbances such as fire and grazing pressure and are dominated by species that include big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii Vitman), Indiangrass [Sorghastrum nutans(L.) Nash], and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.).

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SALTCEDAR AND RUSSIAN OLIVE CONTROL WITH AMINOPYRALID CONTAINING HERBICIDE TREATMENTS

http://techlinenews.com/articles/scro-sleugh-wsws-2010

2010. Proceedings Western Society of Weed Science. V63: p43.

Byron Sleugh, Mary Halstvedt, Chad Cummings, Vanelle Peterson, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN; and Robert G. Wilson, University of Nebraska Panhandle Research Center, Scottsbluff, NE.

 

Chemical control of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.) has had varying degrees of success. Some non-selective herbicides cause unacceptable injury to desirable species or do not control invasive species under the canopy. Aminopyralid (Milestone®) controls many invasive herbaceous broadleaf weeds, but control of saltcedar and Russian olive has not been fully explored. Experiments were established to assess the efficacy of various aminopyralid containing products and aminopyralid and triclopyr (Garlon 3A or Garlon 4 Ultra) mixtures on these plants. Treatments included triclopyr amine and triclopyr ester at various rates plus aminopyralid at 120 g ae/ha (0.l1 lbs ae/acre) and Milestone® VM Plus at 9.6 L/ha (1 gal/acre) [triclopyr amine at 1.12 kg ae/ha (1 lb ae/acre) and aminopyralid 120 g ae/ha (0.11 lb ae/acre)]. At 326 days after application, 3.3 kg ae /ha (3 lbs ae/acre) triclopyr ester plus 120 g ae/ha aminopyralid provided excellent control (98%) of Russian olive and saltcedar (94%), similar to efficacy of imazapyr at 1.12 kg ae/ha (1 lb ae/acre). Triclopyr + aminopyralid treatments caused little to no grass injury (0 to 5%) compared to the imazapyr treatments (50 to 85%). Milestone® VM Plus at 9.6 L/ha provided 91% control of saltcedar and no grass injury. Adding aminopyralid to either the triclopyr amine or triclopyr ester was synergistic and provided increased control of Russian olive and saltcedar thus providing another option for controlling these species without significant injury to desirable understory vegetation.

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Herbicide Incision Point Injection for Woody Plant Control Saves Time and Resources

Herbicide Incision Point Injection for Woody Plant Control Saves Time and Resources

Studies were initiated by the University of Hawai’i Cooperative Extension Service Invasive Weed Management Program to find a method to improve individual plant herbicide application techniques and determine efficacy of various herbicides applied as undiluted formulations.

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Integration of prescribed burning, aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide) and reseeding for restoration of yellow starthistle-infested rangeland

Guy B. Kyser, Arthur W. Hazebrook and Joe DiTomaso (2013-in press) Invasive Plant Science and Management (DOI: 10.1614/IPSM-D-12-00094.1, http://pinnacle.allenpress.com/doi/abs/10.1614/IPSM-D-12-00094.1) 

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Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Undesirable or invasive woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands and native woodlands. Removing invading woody species can be accomplished year-long, with fall, winter and early spring herbicide applications, extending your vegetation management efforts.

 

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Autumn Olive and Russian Olive—What’s the Difference?

Autumn Olive and Russian Olive—What’s the Difference?

Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) are invasive, deciduous, woody shrubs or small trees that were introduced for landscaping, soil stabilization, and wildlife food/cover. Both plants became invasive in riparian areas, open forests, lake shores, and abandoned fields.

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Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Houndstongue often grows in a complex with other weeds, such as spotted knapweed and Canada thistle. Application of Opensight® specialty herbicide, which combines aminopyralid and metsulfuron-methyl in a dry, water-dispersible granule formulation, effectively controls a complex of houndstongue, knapweed, thistle and many other broadleaf weeds with one application.

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Boots On the Ground: Managing Invasive Plants in the Nation's Largest County-Owned Park

Boots On the Ground: Managing Invasive Plants in the Nation's Largest County-Owned Park

Beaver Creek Park lies in north-central Montana where the prairie meets the Bear Paw Mountains. Within this 10,000-acre natural area are riparian meadows, rolling grasslands, pine forests, aspen and cottonwood groves, rocky cliffs and cascading waterfalls. This interface of prairie and mountains supports a diverse mix of geology, wildlife and vegetation that remains as unique today as it was centuries ago. Managing a park this large with limited resources requires sound vegetation management practices. 

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After the Smoke Clears – Resources for Addressing Post-fire Weed Invasion and Expansion

After the Smoke Clears – Resources for Addressing Post-fire Weed Invasion and Expansion

Catastrophic fire seasons of recent decades prompted a number of agencies and researchers to synthesize and expand upon the knowledge-base related to invasive plant issues following wildfires. The following short list of literature reviews, handbooks, and recently published research provides a starting point for exploring issues and developing management guidelines related to invasive plants following wildfires. 

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Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

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Managing Tall Buttercup in Pastures and Natural Areas

Managing Tall Buttercup in Pastures and Natural Areas

Tall buttercup is an introduced perennial forb that is widespread throughout much of North America. It is invasive on irrigated and sub-irrigated pastures, meadows, stream banks, roadsides, and ditches. Integrating various management techniques—prevention along with herbicides, mechanical, manual, biological, and cultural methods—will optimize control of tall buttercup.

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Fall Application of Milestone® to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall Application of Milestone® to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with Milestone. Late summer and fall rains in many areas of the Central Plains and the West in 2010 will provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season.

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Saltcedar and Russian Olive Management

Saltcedar and Russian Olive Management

Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, T. pentandra, T. chinensis, and T. parviflora) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.) are rapid growing, non-native deciduous trees that were introduced into the United States for erosion control (saltcedar), windbreaks (Russian olive) or as ornamental plantings.

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