Are Drones in Your Future?

Are Drones in Your Future?

New technology for treating invasive plants in inaccessible areas—Engineering firms specializing in mobile robotic systems have developed multirotor drones (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle- UAV) complete with a lightweight spray system that can be used for a variety of agricultural applications. 

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Sustainable Management of Non-Native Thistles on Colorado’s Western Slope

Sustainable Management of Non-Native Thistles on Colorado’s Western Slope

A research project was initiated on a 10,670-acre ranch near Cimmarron, Colorado to develop sustainable management strategies for musk and Canada thistle. Objectives of the study were three-fold: 1) Investigate invasive thistle distribution through geospatial analysis; 2) determine effects of musk thistle management on forage quality and native plant diversity; and 3) develop a sustainable invasive plant management plan for the ranch.

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Tamarisk Coalition Unites Partners in Watershed-Scale Restoration

Tamarisk Coalition Unites Partners in Watershed-Scale Restoration

Along the Colorado River near Grand Junction, a group of river guides, biologists, concerned citizens, and conservationists gather for an annual float trip to observe riparian restoration efforts. Rusty Lloyd, program director for the Tamarisk Coalition, and others in this group share concerns about the health of the Colorado and other rivers in the West.

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New Pulse Sprayer Technology Could Be Useful on Rough Terrain

New Pulse Sprayer Technology Could Be Useful on Rough Terrain

The new pulse sprayer technology is being tested to determine its application on range, pasture and natural areas. This technology keeps droplet size large (to prevent drift) by changing the pulsing cycle (nozzle on/off) instead of pressure which changes the droplet size. This could be very useful on rough terrain where it is difficult to maintain constant speeds.

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How much is enough: Effect of Spray Volume on Controlling Invasive Knotweeds

How much is enough: Effect of Spray Volume on Controlling Invasive Knotweeds

Dr. Mark Renz and Tony Summers with the University of Wisconsin conducted a field study in 2014 in McFarland, Wisconsin to determine if the amount of spray volume would impact knotweed control with Milestone at the spot treatment rate of 14 fluid ounces per acre (fl oz/A).

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Effect of Aerial Herbicide Treatments on Russian Olive Control

Effect of Aerial Herbicide Treatments on Russian Olive Control

Historical management of Russian olive includes mechanical cutting, mowing or shredding followed by herbicide treatments. However, there was limited data on the effectiveness of aerial application of triclopyr ester (Remedy® Ultra) or amine (Garlon® 3A) applied alone and in combination with Milestone® specialty herbicide on Russian olive.  Research methods and results from a study conducted in northcentral Montana are described within this article.

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Patience is Key to Controlling Cholla with Herbicides

Patience is Key to Controlling Cholla with Herbicides

Cholla (Cylindropuntia imbricata) often becomes problematic on rangeland when desirable grasses are depleted by drought or over-utilization. The effectiveness of various management methods are discussed including hand and mechanical removal, herbicide rates and  mixing guidelines, and management considerations for using herbicides to optimize cholla control. 

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Twenty Years of Success: Managing Tansy Ragwort in Northwestern Montana

Twenty Years of Success: Managing Tansy Ragwort in Northwestern Montana

The Little Wolf Fire began in August of 1994, burning over 15,000 acres of national forest and private timber lands in northwestern Montana.  Open sites created by the burn and disturbance from fire-fighting activities provided ideal habitat for tansy ragwort. The County Weed District and other partners organized a cooperative weed management area (CWMA) and developed management plans to contain tansy ragwort.

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Synthetic Auxin Herbicides Control Germinating Scotch Broom

Synthetic Auxin Herbicides Control Germinating Scotch Broom

A variety of fire, herbicide, and mechanical treatments are effective for controlling established Scotch broom. However, observations regarding effectiveness of soil-active herbicides in controlling germinating seedlings of Scotch broom are limited. Researchers conducted a series of studies in growth chambers beginning in 2010 to compare the effectiveness of three soil-active auxin herbicides: aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide), clopyralid (Transline® specialty herbicide) and aminocyclopyrachlor for controlling Scotch broom seedling germination. 

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