Woody Plant Control in Northern Prairies

Woody Plant Control in Northern Prairies

Encroachment of woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands. Removing invading woody species improves the function of prairie systems and opens the landscape to provide more suitable habitat for birds and other wildlife that need large blocks of grassland for survival.

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Establishing Wildflowers After Herbicide Application

Establishing Wildflowers After Herbicide Application

by Mark Renz, Mike Moechnig, and Mary Halstvedt

Efforts to restore or rehabilitate mixed wildflower (forb)-grass prairie landscapes in the Midwestern United States are often compromised by the presence of invasive plants. While herbicides provide effective control of invasive plants, they are often not used due to concern that herbicide residues may persist in the soil and impact establishment of wildflowers. Researchers in Wisconsin and South Dakota examined the response of common native wildflower species seeded in the fall or spring following treatments with Milestone® and Transline® herbicides. The results of this research provide promise for land managers balancing invasive plant control and restoring desirable prairie habitat.

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Canada Thistle Management with Herbicides

Canada Thistle Management with Herbicides
Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) is a perennial plant with extensive spreading roots that rapidly forms dense colonies. Vegetative shoots arise from adventitious buds located on Canada thistle roots. Canada thistle also spreads by seed; each shoot can produce more than 1,000 seeds. Plants grow from 1 to 4 feet tall and have spiny, lance-shaped leaves. Purple, lavender, or sometimes white flower heads typically appear from June to October. Read More